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This is a golden chance for all of you who always wanted an education at the world-renowned Stanford University.

Stanford University is offering free online courses under many streams for all now. From Mathematical thinking to Entrepreneurship and  Cryptography, there are some awesome subjects to learn from the best team at Stanford.

The courses started back in August and runs through to January 2013. Following are the courses available.


Algorithms: Design and Analysis, Part 2

Monday, October 1, 2012 to Friday, November 9, 2012

In this course you will learn several fundamental principles of advanced algorithm design. You’ll learn the greedy algorithm design paradigm, with applications to computing good network backbones (i.e., spanning trees) and good codes for data compression. You’ll learn the tricky yet widely applicable dynamic programming algorithm design paradigm, with applications to routing in the Internet and sequencing genome fragments.  You’ll learn what NP-completeness and the famous “P vs. NP” problem means for the algorithm designer.  Finally, we’ll study several strategies for dealing with hard (i.e., NP-complete problems), including the design and analysis of heuristics.  Learn how shortest-path algorithms from the 1950s (i.e., pre-ARPANET!) govern the way that your Internet traffic gets routed today; why efficient algorithms are fundamental to modern genomics; and how to make a million bucks in prize money by “just” solving a math problem!

Solar Cells, Fuels Cells, and Batteries

Monday, October 8, 2012

This course focuses on the operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. We will begin with discussing the scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries will be discussed in quantitative detail. We will explore performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. Finally, we will end with the promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions.

An Introduction to Computer Networks

Friday, October 12, 2012

This is an introductory course on computer networking, specifically the Internet. It focuses on explaining how the Internet works, ranging from how bits are modulated on wires and in wireless to application-level protocols like BitTorrent and HTTP. It also explains the principles of how to design networks and network protocols. Students gain experience reading and understanding RFCs (Internet protocol specifications) as statements of what a system should do. The course grounds many of the concepts in current practice and recent developments, such as net neutrality and DNS security.

Startup Boards: Advanced Entrepreneurship

Monday, October 15, 2012 to Thursday, December 20, 2012

This is an advanced entrepreneurship class, designed for teams who have already started a company or are seriously thinking about starting a company. We encourage teams to take this class together as much of the work will be focused on working with your board to make real progress on the most important issues in your startup.

Technology Entrepreneurship

Monday, October 15, 2012

This course introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. You will learn the process technology entrepreneurs use to start companies. It involves taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity, gathering resources such as talent and capital, figuring out how to sell and market the idea, and managing rapid growth. To gain practical experience alongside the theory, students form teams and work on startup projects in those teams.

Designing a New Learning Environment

Monday, October 15, 2012 to Thursday, December 20, 2012

What constitutes learning in the 21st century? Should reading, watching, memorizing facts, and then taking exams be the only way to learn? Or could technology (used effectively) make learning more interactive, collaborative, and constructive? Could learning be more engaging and fun?

We construct, access, visualize, and share information and knowledge in very different ways than we did decades ago. The amount and types of information created, shared, and critiqued every day is growing exponentially, and many skills required in today’s working environment are not taught in formal school systems. In this more complex and highly-connected world, we need new training and competency development—we need to design a new learning environment.


Monday, October 15, 2012 to Friday, December 14, 2012

This is a 10 week course. There will be several short (5-30 minutes) lectures each week. Challenges covering the lecture material will be given each week. There will also be two projects that involve real financial data. Solutions will be posted online. Submissions will be evaluated by fellow participants.

A Crash Course on Creativity

Wednesday, October 17, 2012 to Friday, December 7, 2012

This crash course is designed to explore several factors that stimulate and inhibit creativity in individuals, teams, and organizations. In each session we will focus on a different variable related to creativity, such as framing problems, challenging assumptions, and creative teams.

The course is highly experiential, requiring each student to participate actively, taking on weekly projects. Each Wednesday a new challenge will be presented, and the results are due the following Tuesday. Some of the challenges will be completed individually, and some will be done in teams. There will be a two-week project toward the end of the course that will allow you to use all the tools you have learned.


Monday, November 5, 2012 to Friday, December 14, 2012

Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. This course explains the inner workings of cryptographic primitives and how to correctly use them. Students will learn how to reason about the security of cryptographic constructions and how to apply this knowledge to real-world applications. The course begins with a detailed discussion of how two parties who have a shared secret key can communicate securely when a powerful adversary eavesdrops and tampers with traffic. We will examine many deployed protocols and analyze mistakes in existing systems. The second half of the course discusses public-key techniques that let two or more parties generate a shared secret key. We will cover the relevant number theory and discuss public-key encryption, digital signatures, and authentication protocols. Towards the end of the course we will cover more advanced topics such as zero-knowledge, distributed protocols such as secure auctions, and a number of privacy mechanisms. Throughout the course students will be exposed to many exciting open problems in the field.

The course will include written homeworks and programming labs. The course is self-contained, however it will be helpful to have a basic understanding of discrete probability theory.

I’ve already signed up. Make use of it – Sign up here.

Logo credit – CCA North